Food Pantry – Open Thursdays from 4:30 to 5:30

 

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Connie Aull

Earl Herring

Manager: Connie Aull

Pantry Workers:  Earl Herring, Marsha Blissett, Rose Cotton, Alice Hall

The North Harnett Food Pantry has been operated from the Kipling United Methodist Church for over 25 years. The Food Pantry is supported from local community churches and individuals desiring to ensure that families who need assistance are provided essential food items. In many ways, America is the land of plenty. But for 1 in 6 Americans, hunger is a reality. Many people believe that the problems associated with hunger are confined to small pockets of society, certain areas of the country, or certain neighborhoods, but the reality is much different. Right now, millions of Americans are struggling with hunger. These are often hard-working adults, children and seniors who simply cannot make ends meet and are forced to go without food for several meals, or even days. According to the USDA more than 17 million children are living in food insecure households. School lunch programs help but they do not solve the problem. According to the USDA limited resources prevent 50 million Americas from getting enough food.

Needs: Peanut Butter, Rice, Canned Vegetables, Canned Meats, Cereal, Jelly, Dried Beans, Canned and Powdered Milk

Matthew 25

For I was hungry, and you gave me something to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me something to drink; I was a stranger, and you invited me in; naked, and you clothed me; I was sick, and you visited me; I was in prison, and you came to me. Then the righteous will answer Him, ‘Lord, when did we see You hungry, and feed You, or thirsty, and give You something to drink? And when did we see You a stranger, and invite You in, or naked, and clothe You? ‘When did we see You sick, or in prison, and come to You? The King will answer and say to them, ‘Truly I say to you, to the extent that you did it to one of these brothers of Mine, even the least of them, you did it to Me.’

Hunger and Poverty Fact Sheet

Poverty Statistics in the United States[i]

In 2015:

  • 43.1 million people (13.5 percent) were in poverty.
  • 24.4 million (12.4 percent) of people ages 18-64 were in poverty.
  • 14.5 million (19.7 percent) children under the age of 18 were in poverty.
  • 4.2 million (8.8 percent) seniors 65 and older were in poverty.
  • The overall poverty rate according to the Supplemental Poverty Measure is 14.3 percent, significantly higher than the official poverty rate of 13.5 percent.[ii]
  • Under the Supplemental Poverty Measure, there are 45.7 million people living in poverty, 2.6 million more than are represented by the official poverty measure (43.1 million).[iii]

Food Insecurity and Very Low Food Security[iv]

In 2015:

  • 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.
  • 13 percent of households (15.8 million households) were food insecure.
  • 5 percent of households (6.3 million households) experienced very low food security.
  • Households with children reported food insecurity at a significantly higher rate than those without children, 17 percent compared to 11 percent.
  • Households that had higher rates of food insecurity than the national average included households with children (17%), especially households with children headed by single women (30%) or single men (22%), Black non-Hispanic households (22%) and Hispanic households (19%).

Twelve states exhibited statistically significantly higher household food-insecurity rates than the U.S. national average 2013-2015 (13.7%)[vii]:

  1. Mississippi 20.8 %
  2. Arkansas 19.2 %
  3. Louisiana 18.4 %
  4. Alabama 17.6 %
  5. Kentucky 17.6 %
  6. Ohio 16.1 %
  7. Oregon 16.1 %
  8. North Carolina 15.9 %
  9. Maine 15.8 %
  10. Oklahoma 15.5 %
  11. Texas 15.4 %
  12. Tennessee 15.1 %

For more information on hunger in American click on this link: http://feedingamerica.org/

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